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5 Things to Expect From a New Job After Completing a Hands-On Dental Assisting Program

July 17, 2019

Filed under: Uncategorized — drtesterman @ 3:01 am

a dentist and dental assistant helping a young female patientIf you are preparing to wrap up your hands-on dental assisting program, you’re probably ready to get started on your new career as a dental assistant, right? Before you eagerly move forward, there are a few things you might find beneficial to know when starting a new job. Allow us to explain what you can expect, so you aren’t alarmed on your first day.

Making a Good Impression is Key

It’s normal to have first day jitters, but the best thing you can do is try to stay calm. Before arriving, make sure you look your best. You may be wearing scrubs, but you can make sure your hair is styled, teeth are brushed (that’s a big one!), and you exude confidence. Be careful not to come across as arrogant though! Making a good first impression is key to starting off your dental assisting career on the right foot.

The Preferences and Style of the Dentist

Every dentist has their own way of doing things, which is why it’s important to spend the first few days paying close attention to how the dentist works. It will be beneficial to watch closely and ask questions, especially if you’re asking them in a way that shows the dentist you are looking to find out how they would like for you to perform a certain task.

The Importance of Remembering Everyone’s Name

If you’re like most people, remembering names is not an easy task. It’s your first day on the job, and you’re so busy trying to remember how best to use the skills you learned in dental assisting school that the idea of having to remember everyone’s name is practically impossible. Remember, it takes time, but strive to work hard at remembering not only staff but patient names. A client will feel welcomed and appreciated if greeted by their name when they enter the office.

Trying to Make Work Friends

It’s not always easy making new friends. You probably learned that while in elementary school. Guess what? It’s usually not much easier when you’re an adult in the working world. You might not be as shy, but let’s face it: some people just have a harder time accepting others into their own “clique.” The first thing you should learn is to avoid drama and attempt to make friends with your colleagues. It doesn’t have to be a friendship that requires weekly outings for happy hour, but it can be a relationship that is built on providing support for one another through the highs and lows.

Having to Learn and Understand Systems

The first day in a new job can be daunting, especially when there is so much to learn. You might feel as if you did enough learning during your program, but rest assured, that was only the beginning. Once you’re in a dentist office setting, there are all sorts of new systems you’ll be responsible for learning, including:

  • Phone systems
  • Computer systems
  • Supply inventory

Don’t worry; it will take time, but everyone must start somewhere. It is best if you find someone in the office who can help you and serve as your go-to person while you’re in the learning phase of your new job.

Don’t be intimated or scared at the idea of starting a new job as a dental assistant. As we mentioned earlier, everyone has a first day, and the only way to become one of the seasoned professionals is to start from the beginning.

About Dental Assistant Pro
For more than 25 years, Dental Assistant Pro has been providing aspiring dental assistants with essential knowledge and hands-on skills learning. Our philosophy is the best dental assisting training should be taught in a dental office at an affordable cost, so why not take a chance and enroll in our 10-week course schedule? It’s now more affordable than ever to become a dental assistant! To learn more about us, visit our website or call (513) 515-6611.

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